Paper Mache fun at MUJC

IMG_20180125_114740115We are covering the forms with paper now.  These students are doing so well that they complete whatever I bring in for the day.  This is another messy job but we have a big tarp under the work table to contain the mess.  This time I am using unyru paper rolls and diluted elmers glue.  I love this paper but it has gotten too expensive to use in my future school projects.  I will switch to bogus paper available at places that sell packaging material.  It is recycled newsprint and kraft paper but slightly heavier.  You need a paper that is unsized so it is more malleable.  Sized papers are stiff.  Unsized papers eventually become pulp.  Unryu is very strong,stays workable for a long time and covers in one or two layers.  Bogus paper usually requires more layers and isn’t as malleable but it works well enough and it’s cheap.  My personal favorite is blotter paper.  It is thick and covers in one layer but turns to pulp fast so hard to use with kids.  Last year I used what I called art snot as an adhesive with what I called bogie paper.  Great art terms for 2nd graders.  It is methyl cellulose and I used Elmers art paste.  I had trouble with the layers de-laminating and haven’t tested it again so I went with white glue which I know works.  The paper needs to form a hard stable surface over the foam.


Off and running at MUJC school

Last Thursday was our first day getting our hands dirty.  Our design is becoming large foam forms to paper mache.  I’m putting the forms together at home and bringing them in for the students to paper mache.  The students are enjoying the process and do very well at this task.  They are working well together which is good to see.  IMG_20180123_153057309These are the forms for the center of the mural.  What will become the sunflower is almost 8 feet tall.  We are using 2 inch polystyrene insulation board available at building supplies.  I insert wood furring strips or washers in places so that our installation hardware will not tear through the foam.


The tools I use to cut and shape foam are pictured here.  Knives cut foam better than saws.  I tried a hot knife but wasn’t happy with it especially the smell.  I use a utility knife and an old bread knife.  I use a fine tooth handsaw for inserting wood.  I tie the wood to the foam with rebar wire.  You can use packing tape,duct tape,whatever works to attach other things together.  You can make a shape out of more than one piece and join them.  I often pin pieces together with dowels.  Like doing drywall the form doesn’t have to be perfect but the better it is the easier it is to cover.  It also needs to be structurally sturdy so no wiggly loose parts.  I shape the foam with the bread knife and smooth it with a corrugated shaper.  It is a messy process.  I had the bad experience of having a school order the white foam made of little balls.  Don’t ever get this.  We had little foam balls everywhere!


A new year of Learning

Happy New Year.  This week I start 2 new residencies.  As always I am excited and scared.  I never get used to meeting new students and always have the jitters.  Age has perfected my on top of it teacher facade.  This year I am doing another big messy public art like project in Warren NJ.  I will be working with special needs teenagers building a high relief mural. MK YA Mural design 9-2017008

I often feel like I am the only teaching artist in NJ that does these projects that require scale shop drawings, budgets,and material lists to be approved by building staff to meet code.  This school got it right in getting these things out of the way in the beginning.  I have had a few projects that did not and I left the residency without an installation because of building approvals.  We started planning in September and are just now ready to dive in.  The drawing lays out a basic template for our design.  Student input will determine what it will actually look like within those parameters.  I have found that it is very important with special needs kids to have a concrete clear simple plan to follow.  I have also found that it helps with all schools to have a preplanned template to improv from.  The key is to listen,be open to what is happening, and feel free enough to change it up if you see something great or it isn’t working.  I try really hard to be a facilitator not a prima dona artist.  My second residency is an after school program in Vineland doing stopmotion…with 3 Ipads.  I have been so inspired by the website but her kids all have Ipads.  I am still working on having a few Ipads with kids that are so hungry to play with them.

So like I always say…Let the fun begin!

A Quiet Totem Finale


This week I put the totem together in the garden.  It’s cold now and the garden is covered in leaves and we can’t take kids outside.  It does look great though.  I put the sections together with landscape adhesive and shimmed it level as I added parts.  I have never never used construction adhesive to join this kind of thing so it will be interesting to see how it holds up.  In the spring it will get grouted between the parts or taken apart if the adhesive fails and mortared together.


Grouting Done!


I finished the grouting at home today.  Grouting can be so time sensitive.  If you clean it too early you remove grout and too late and it becomes hard to clean.  Today I was lucky and got it just right.  I mixed grey Portland cement today since I’ve been working with it on my own projects.  The proportion I use is one part Portland to 3 parts  yellow sand.  You can use commercial grout unless you have big spaces between tiles.  When the tiles dry and lighten I rub off grout with a dry sanding sponge.  Then I use a wet sponge that has been rung out and not too wet.  The last step is to use a dry towel to polish the tiles a bit and then you are done.  The grout can be stained with diluted acrylics if needed or you can add powder or liquid color to the mix.  I will color the base once it drys.   The doves still need to be filled out with a white Portland cement and white sand mix.  It is harder to find but the very fine bright white sand sometimes used in ashtrays is my favorite.  Next I will put a foundation in the garden and install in the Bancroft garden.  I can’t wait!

Landis Middle School


I hope to revisit school projects this year to see how they look today.  I worked in an after school program for several years on a small garden.  We started in 2009.  Students designed and I helped build these sculptures.  Landis is no longer a school but looks like a construction site today.  It is a historic building so it is being renovated in some way for a new purpose.  Trailers were removed so one side of the garden is open now.  Flourishing weeds surround the sculpture.   It has faded but still looks good.  Alphonso the squirrel still greets whoever comes by.  To see the garden at the height of it’s glory check it out at’09